Monday, May 4, 2015

7th Graders Study the Diversity of Life

Mrs. Sullivan's 7th grade life science students have been learning about the diversity of life. They were assigned a specific group of organisms to explore, such as: protists, sponges, cnidarians, worms, echinoderms, mollusks, arthropods, insects, or fungi. Each partnership had to answer specific questions about their organisms and then teach the class about their creatures. They also had to design an activity to reinforce the concepts they were presenting and give their classmates a quiz on the material.

The theme of the unit was GREATNESS! The students agreed that they wanted to be wowed by the presentations and activities. They were not disappointed.


June Hsu tries to move without joints.
The arthropod group taped the jointed appendages from their volunteers volunteers and challenged them to eat a piece of candy. Not that easy without jointed appendages!








Levi Snowden eating a cricket




The insect group had the class eating crickets.

Emily Binderʻs jellyfish in a bottle
The cnidarian group had students building the polyps out of marshmallows, frosting, and sour twizzlers. These students demonstrated the other part of the cnidarian life cycle by demonstrating how to build the medusa in a water bottle.

The protist group organized a Jeopardy-style game to help students remember their information.

Kingdom fungi students demonstrated how spores are released from a fruiting body by popping a balloon full of spores. They also visited the mushroom farm in Lawai, raised mushrooms, and brought a chef in to cook (thank you, Michael McSweeney)!


The mollusk students taught the parts of a squid by leading
a dissection! They used the document camera to demonstrate and then the circulated around the room to make sure each student found the parts on their own squid!

These students learned so much science, but they also practiced reading technical writing for essential ideas, presentation skills, using teamwork to make it all happen.






Conor Hunt and Makali‘i Oliveira use a document camera to show the class their dissection.